Chris Christie, close Trump ally, suggests it may soon be 'time to move on'

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Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a longtime ally of President Donald Trump, said the president needs to show proof of his various claims of electoral fraud or else Republicans “can’t do this” anymore.

It was so important early on to say to the president: ‘If your basis for not conceding is that there was voter fraud, then show us,'” Christie told ABC’s “This Week.” “Show us. Because if you can’t show us, we can’t do this. We can’t back you blindly without evidence.”

Joe Biden was on Saturday projected to win the presidency after securing more than 270 Electoral College votes. But the president has not yet conceded the race, continuing to falsely claim he won the election while promoting unfounded claims of voter fraud.

“I’m hoping that more Republicans move in the direction of saying, not that we don’t support the president, he’s been a friend of mine for 20 years, but friendship doesn’t mean that you’re blind,” Christie added. “Friendship means that you’ll listen to somebody, give them their opportunity, and if they don’t come forward with the proof, then it’s time to move on.”

Read more here.

Netanyahu, a Trump ally, congratulates Biden

Trump returns to golf course one day after Biden wins

Romney warns Trump rhetoric on election challenges could encourage authoritarians

Nov. 8, 202007:39

Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, on Sunday warned President Donald Trump to be “careful” as he continues to challenge the results of the 2020 election and not to push America toward a “course in history which would be very, very unfortunate.”

“I think it’s fine to pursue every legal avenue that one has,” Romney said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “But I think one has to be careful in the choice of words. I think when you say that the election was corrupt or stolen or rigged, that’s, unfortunately, rhetoric that gets picked up by authoritarians around the world.”

Read more on this story at NBCNews.com and watch “Meet the Press” Sunday morning

Jared Kushner advising Trump to ‘pursue his legal remedies’ to the election

A source close to Jared Kushner tells NBC News that Kushner “has advised [President Trump] to pursue his legal remedies” to the election.

Trump as recently as this morning continued to use Twitter to highlight supporters’ allegations of fraud and corruption in the race, while providing no evidence for these claims.

Nov. 8, 202004:42

Biden team announces first steps in transition plan

The Biden transition team on Sunday will launch its full website and social media channels: BuildBackBetter.com and @transition46 on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Additional details from the team:

“For months, the transition team has been laying the groundwork for a potential Biden-Harris administration, so that Joe Biden and Kamala Harris can begin to take action on the critical issues facing our country.

The crises we are facing are severe–from a global pandemic to an economic recession to racial injustice to the climate crisis. Our work continues full speed today.

On Monday, President-elect Biden will name a group of leading scientists and experts as Transition Advisors to help take the Biden-Harris COVID plan and convert it into an action blueprint that starts on January 20, 2021.

Agency review teams will begin their duties this week, gaining access to federal agencies at the appropriate point. 

And across the board we will continue laying the foundation for the incoming Biden-Harris administration to successfully restore faith and trust in our institutions and lead the federal government.”

Biden plans vast agenda with Senate on the line

WASHINGTON — President-elect Joe Biden offered voters an agenda that tried to balance his moderate inclinations and the clamor among his progressive base to implement big change.

The former vice president promised to “build back better” with large, sweeping programs and reforms designed to charge the economy and address problems like health care and racial inequality.

When he is sworn into office in January, he will have to grapple with the reality left by a split decision on Election Day — that while he won, his party failed to make enough gains in the Senate to ensure that he will have friendly cooperation in Congress to enact his proposals.

Read more here.

How Black voters in key cities helped deliver the election for Joe Biden

ATLANTA — In the way that one could on election night 2020, LaTosha Brown was making the rounds.

Between bites of food and watching election returns turn bits of the national map red or blue, Brown juggled calls, internet video sessions and texts, in each countering the conventional wisdom with journalists, political operatives and others that the election would come down to Donald Trump’s mythical all-white suburbs filled with stay-at-home moms or Joe Biden’s ability to convert them. Instead, it was decided in racially diverse urban centers and increasingly diverse suburbs in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Nevada, Arizona and Georgia.

The Black people who make up 39 percent or more of the population in those areas chose Biden, with some exceptions. In fact, once the vote counts from Philadelphia, Detroit, Milwaukee and Atlanta started to near completion, Trump’s lead in their respective states disappeared. Biden — who would not have been the Democratic presidential nominee without Black voters in South Carolina — reached 270 Electoral College votes in large part because of Black voters in these cities.

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ANALYSIS: Biden won. Now comes the unimaginably hard part.

Joe Biden addresses supporters as Sen. Kamala D. Harris, D-Calif., listens inside The Chase Center on Nov. 4, 2020 in Wilmington, Del.Demetrius Freeman / The Washington Post via Getty Images

The good news for President-elect Joe Biden is that he defeated Donald Trump. The bad news is he has to preside over an angry and polarized nationa broken Congress, and the continuing economic and public health crises posed by the coronavirus.

He has promised to unify the country, a brutal task that will require him to manage the expectations of the left wing of his own party and the anger of defeated Republicans. And to enact his legislative agenda, he will have to satisfy a Senate that may be led by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., depending on the outcome of remaining races, as well as a House led by Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. The political bases of both sides are suspicious of anything that unites them.

That’s why many political insiders say Biden will only be successful if his presidency matches a campaign in which he rejected the most extreme proposals of fellow Democrats and embraced coalition-of-the-willing Republicans.

“It’s going to be a difficult environment,” Doug Heye, a former leadership aide on Capitol Hill who backed Biden, said. “He may be the best-suited person to get anything done.”

Read the story.

In first days in office, Biden to sign executive orders reversing Trump actions

WILMINGTON, Del. — A senior campaign official for President-elect Joe Biden confirmed Saturday night that Biden will make good on his longstanding promise to immediately sign a number of executive orders aimed at reversing several of President Donald Trump’s unilateral actions.

The Washington Post reported Saturday on a flurry of executive actions Biden has planned for his first days in office — most already announced through various policy rollouts made during the long campaign. Those actions will include rejoining the Paris climate accords and reversing Trump’s withdrawal from the World Health Organization, the Post reported, citing those close to his campaign and commitments he has made in recent months.  

Biden will officially launch his transition on Monday and will name his coronavirus task force, which he mentioned in his acceptance speech.

“Folks our work begins with getting Covid under control…on Monday I will name a group of leading scientists and experts as transition advisers to help take the Biden-Harris Covid plan and convert it into an action blueprint that will start on January 20th 2021,” Biden said Saturday night.

Marianna Sotomayor, Deepa Shivaram, Amanda Golden, Molly Roecker, Elyse Perlmutter-Gumbiner, Gary Grumbach and Winston Wilde contributed to this report.