Australia to release 'long-term' emissions reduction strategy later in year: Angus Taylor

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Energy and Emissions Reduction Minister Angus Taylor has maintained Australia’s climate “ambitions are ambitious” and said the Morrison government will release its long-term strategy before the upcoming Glasgow climate conference. The Morrison government announced $1.1 billion in funding for clean energy sources including hydrogen, and carbon capture and storage in a bid to reduce emissions. The announcements came ahead of a global climate summit hosted by President Joe Biden tonight, but Mr Taylor denied the funding was strategically announced before the summit. “This is all about continuing down the path we’ve been going down for some time which is focusing on technology, not taxes as a means for reducing emissions,” he said. The summit has seen major developed nations like the United States and the UK commit to greater mid-term emissions reductions targets in a bid to sure up investment and extend ambition globally. Mr Taylor said Australia’s current climate targets and technology investments “are ambitious there’s no doubt about that”. “We meet and beat our targets which a lot of countries don’t do,” he said. “We’re on track to not only meet our 2030 targets but beat them, we’ll be releasing our long-term strategy later in the year ahead of Glasgow. “Our projections will be updated later in the year, our long term strategy will come out later on in the year and I’m confident, based on past experience, that they will be positive; we’ll continue to improve our position.”

Energy and Emissions Reduction Minister Angus Taylor has maintained Australia’s climate “ambitions are ambitious” and said the Morrison government will release its long-term strategy before the upcoming Glasgow climate conference.

The Morrison government announced $1.1 billion in funding for clean energy sources including hydrogen, and carbon capture and storage in a bid to reduce emissions.

The announcements came ahead of a global climate summit hosted by President Joe Biden tonight, but Mr Taylor denied the funding was strategically announced before the summit.

“This is all about continuing down the path we’ve been going down for some time which is focusing on technology, not taxes as a means for reducing emissions,” he said.

The summit has seen major developed nations like the United States and the UK commit to greater mid-term emissions reductions targets in a bid to sure up investment and extend ambition globally.

Mr Taylor said Australia’s current climate targets and technology investments “are ambitious there’s no doubt about that”.

“We meet and beat our targets which a lot of countries don’t do,” he said.

“We’re on track to not only meet our 2030 targets but beat them, we’ll be releasing our long-term strategy later in the year ahead of Glasgow.

“Our projections will be updated later in the year, our long term strategy will come out later on in the year and I’m confident, based on past experience, that they will be positive; we’ll continue to improve our position.”

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